Ever Wondered Why Chinese Babies Wear Split Pants Instead of Diapers? 

Kai Dang Ku: Good or Bad?

Ever Wondered Why Chinese Babies Wear Split Pants Instead of Diapers? 
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Well, children are the most adorable fluff-balls in the world, and anything that they do cannot be seen as awful. Be it the weird noises that they make as they learn to speak, or all the times they fall as they learn to stand on their own, or even all the mess they make, as they learn to discipline themselves.

But there's something about Chinese babies that makes them stand 'apart' from the rest of the world. While the rest of the world keeps their babies safe from their poopy mess in diapers, Chinese parents prefer an alternate approach.

Kai Dang Ku, that are essentially split-crotch pants worn by the infants in the country giving them an easy access to the basic physiological needs. But while the kids and the people of China are loving the trends, tourists are not having as much fun, being mooned by the infants crouching on the streets.

Let's look into it.

Kai Dang Ku

Kai Dang Ku

It is a traditional attire, to dress your toddlers in, that is open from the rear. It is true that today these garments are worn less than before, but they do not pass unnoticed.

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 'Why' you ask? 

 'Why' you ask? 
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For people from the country, this seems quite normal. For many foreigners, it is difficult to understand this phenomenon. Many see it is an antisocial, unhygienic habit that ends up hurting children. Even after the introduction of disposable diapers, Kai Dang Ku is popular in the Chinese society.

What good does it do?

What good does it do?
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Educators recognize that babies who wear this clothing, learn the bathroom-habit faster than usual. The family who generally take care of babies often reprimand them, when they go to the wrong place. With this, the babies understand the activity faster.

The debate behind split-crotch pants

The debate behind split-crotch pants
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In China, babies are trained to do the 'poo-poo', from the age of three or four months, while in the West, it happens after they are one year and a half. And despite this, the foreigners are raising their eyebrows over the weird, and unhygienic fashion trend among Chinese babies.

What bad does it do?

What bad does it do?
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It is not uncommon to find a kid, crouching out on a street corner, or maybe a garden, doing their needs as they wish. And this is exactly what is the basic reason for the notion, against the split-pants. As a result, public areas remain dirty, smelly and at risk of attracting bugs and diseases. This situation is even more evident as you go in the interiors and remotes of China.

Experts' opinions

Experts' opinions
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According to the specialists, these pants were brought into use since there were no disposable diapers, and leaves a space for the babies' body who cannot yet control their actions. Though the doctors find the use of diapers more hygienic for children, they also warn that if they aren't changed regularly and timely, they can cause infections.

 Pros, that affect on a longer run

 Pros, that affect on a longer run
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Some even say that Kai Dang Ku is especially beneficial for children and the proper development of their sexual organs being developed outdoors, without pressure or heat.

Split-pants: Good or bad?

Split-pants: Good or bad?

But because of these pros, the cons cannot be ignored, regarding the unsightly nature of these garments along with the disgust and unhygienic it tends to be. But over the quicker development of children's coordination over their actions, it's tough to take one side on this.

A country, where diapers are a status symbol...

A country, where diapers are a status symbol...
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China is on a gradual path to the world's fastest growing disposable diaper markets. But, diapers are still pricey here, especially in interior China. And purchasing them represents one's buying power and elevated status. In the same go, Chinese parents prefer to stick with the traditions for their own and their children's betterment, bypassing the judgemental eyes they inevitably get from the world.

Conclusion

Conclusion

Essentially apart from the frequent mooning, disciplinary control over the usage of Kai Dang Ku, the Chinese would be able to retain their tradition; and save the world from the tons and tons of garbage, caused by disposable diapers, while at it.

That's all, folks.

You can read more about the Kai Dang Ku here. Share your thoughts in the comment section and you can reach out to me on harsh@wittyfeed.com