15 Top Differences Between Game Of Thrones TV Series And Books

#10 is my favourite.

15 Top Differences Between Game Of Thrones TV Series And Books
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There's an old tradition in the business of telling the story through videos; great directors and producers pick the best authors and convert their books into the video to bring the readers' favourite character to life. But when a famous author's book is adapted into a film or television series, one thing comes mandatory, and that's the change. Both, the producer and writer understand the importance of these changes as the medium of telling the story changes.

After months and sometimes years of brainstorming, the scriptwriter and book author conclude what needs to change and what needs to be kept intact to preserve the original essence of author's imagination.

When it came to Game of Thrones, the changes were as large as this epic fantasy. And as the season seven of the series has already taken toll of people, we are bringing you some of the biggest changes that were made in the Game of Thrones TV series.

Have a look!

Everyone's favourite sellsword Daaario Naharis looks way different in books.

Everyone's favourite sellsword Daaario Naharis looks way different in books.

In the books, Daario Naharis is described as somewhat more extravagant than shown in the series. He is Tyroshi, and they're known for wearing the bright coloured clothes and dyeing their hair. In the novel 'Storm of the Swords' Daario is described as a man with long hair, gold moustache and one gold tooth in front. While Ed Skrein and Michiel Huisman have done their job well, they're not exactly what George R.R. Martin imagined.

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Missandei

Missandei
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In the series you see Missandei sharing some intense moments with Grey Worm, but that doesn't happen anytime soon in the book as Missandei is only ten years old.

Mance Rayder

Mance Rayder
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Ciaran Hinds who portrayed the character of Mance Rayder deserved to last long in the series only if it followed the book. But, he was burned alive at stake.

Ser Jorah Mormont

Ser Jorah Mormont
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Ser Jorah also looks quite different in the books as compared to how he is shown in the series. In the book, he is described as Daenerys Targaryen's "black bear" about his black hair, as his body is described as quite hairy.

The concept of Greyscale

The concept of Greyscale
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Ohh, one more thing, Ser Mormont doesn't get grey scale in the books, as he does in the Game of Thrones television series. The showrunners smartly combined another characters life with Mormont who hasn't appeared in the show: Jon Connington.

Sansa Stark

Sansa Stark

The entire plot for Sansa is changed. In the book, Sansan never gets marries to Ramsey, hasn't met with Jon and she gets nowhere close to Winterfell.

Littlefinger

Littlefinger
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Littlefinger has some big tricks in his mind for Sansa, and they're very different in the book than in the show. Like for one, he was not at all intentional about marrying her.

The Tyrell line

The Tyrell line
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In season six, it was shown that Tyrell line is entirely wiped out as Margaery, Loras and Mace die in the 'Sept of Baelor'.  But according to the books, two other Tyrell sons aren't dead.

The Targaryens

The Targaryens
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Targaryens are famously depicted to have purple eyes and silver-blond hair, according to the book. They got the hair right for both of the characters in the series, but producers decided not to go with the eyes colour.

Khal Drogo

Khal Drogo
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Khal Drogo doesn't have bells in his hair throughout season one, despite knowing that it's a famous cultural tradition for Dothraki in the books.

Sword practice

Sword practice
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In the book, Bronn never helps Jaime in practising the sword fighting. Rather, it's Ilyn Payne who does that, as Jaime has a good reason to pick Payne.

Sam and Gilly

Sam and Gilly

Both of them go to the Oldtown in the book and as well as in the show, but in the book, they go with the alive Maester Aemon who sadly dies on the way. Whereas, in the series, they already killed the Maester.

Lysa Arryn

Lysa Arryn
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In the book, it makes more sense why Lysa is so obsessed with her son, and you start to feel for her, leaving all the drama aside. The show didn't explore her that deeply and that's why she's mostly seen as a mad woman. In author's imagination, her past is heartrending.

Shae cheats on Tyrion

Shae cheats on Tyrion

The show and books, both have shown Shae in a bit different manner. In the show, Shae genuinely builds the feelings for Tyrion, whereas in the book she saw her relationship with him mostly as the business transaction. In the end, she cheats him at both the places.

So, what are you waiting for?

So, what are you waiting for?

Go out and flaunt this piece of information to your friends and family.


That's all, folks!