10 Classic Jack Nicholson Movies No One Can Dare To Miss

The man who set the standard for The Joker. 

10 Classic Jack Nicholson Movies No One Can Dare To Miss
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Born to act and to fit exactly into the norms of stardom and philosophy of Hollywood, there is and ever will be, only one Jack Nicholson. The legendary actor has been nominated twelve times for the Academy Awards out of which he won the accolade three times.

If we talk about his appearance, he's not a charmer with abs, and some of his films would make you run in the opposite direction. However, he has played some compelling characters with his style of acting. If you look at this lifestyle, he only doesn't give a f*** about what everyone else thinks. And people who've seen him off-screen would agree to this as well. 

Let's have a look at the classic films of Jack Nicholson which are favorites of every movie buff. 

10) Batman (1989)

10) Batman (1989)

Today's generation was hypnotized by Heath Ledger's iconic performance of The Joker in "The Dark Knight," Generation X-ers were likewise swept away by Nicholson's appearance in the same role in "Batman." 

Although some people still argue that Ledger's modernized take on Joker's character dominated Nicholson's. But, the truth is; there's no comparison between the two.

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9) Chinatown (1974)

9) Chinatown (1974)
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Director Roman Polanski's masterpiece film becomes noir class on its head by telling the tale of single hard-boiled investigator Jakes Gittes, whose association in a controversy over California water rights (based on the actual story of California Water Wars) shortly shows him to the depths of plutocratic desire and human wickedness. The character remains one of the most remarkable ones ever played by Jack.

8) About Schmidt (2002)

8) About Schmidt (2002)
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Nicholson's portrayal of enthusiastic Marine Colonel Nathan R. Jessup is best recognized for its quotable dialogue ("You can't handle the truth!"). In this era of right-wing reactionism and neo-imperialist army excess, the cold reasoning used by Jessup to justify his gross disregard for human life advances to ring chillingly true. This film earned him Oscars nomination for Best Actor in a supporting role.

7) Anger Management (2003)

7) Anger Management (2003)
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One of the Adam Sandler's genuine efforts, this film is lifted up and drifted efficiently by the presence of Jack Nicholson.

Playing his crazy maniac persona for laughter, "Anger Management" was excellent in the way that it introduced Jack to a younger generation of audience, not certainly the ones that have supported his career since "Easy Rider."

6) Iron Weed (1987)

6) Iron Weed (1987)
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This is one of Jack's emotionally fresh and revealing act of his career. You, as an audience, entirely sense his grief and sheer psychological mayhem as to what has made him the person that you see ahead of you.

5) A Few Good Men (1992)

5) A Few Good Men (1992)

Rob Reiner's "A Few Good Men," in connection to Jack, is a theoretical example of how it's not the quantity of screen time you get, it's the way that you utilize it to put an impact.

4) The Departed (2006)

4) The Departed (2006)
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Martin Scorsese had waited almost entire life for an Oscar, and the Academy finally honored him for this film, The Departed. However, Nicholson wasn't chosen for his work playing Boston mob kingpin Frank Costello. But still, his talent to touch into the spirit of real-life mobster Whitey Bulger is still electrifying. 

3) As Good as It Gets (1997)

3) As Good as It Gets (1997)
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The design and idea that people miss each other are modern and timeless. "As Good As It Gets" pictures this on a fairly reasonable passionate level and order. It is some of the excellent work of both the lead performer and the filmmaker.

2) One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

2) One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)
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Based on the counter-culture classic by Ken Kesey, this Oscar-winning film from Miloš Forman instituted the "societal rebel stuck in a mental hospital" backdrop that has been shredded off by so many minor movies ever since.

1) The Shining (1980)

1) The Shining (1980)
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Jack Nicholson plays a passionate lunatic writer? What a colorful canvas this film is. 

Jokes apart, the very point that Nicholson appears like such a shoo-in now for any role expecting a great, terrifyingly psychotic antagonist is because of his magisterial depiction of grieving writer Jack Torrance in this Stanley Kubrick fear film. The movie earned mixed reviews at the box-office upon its original release.


That's all, folks!

Isn't Jack Nicholson a great actor?